Priority 3: Build our partnership with industry

Industry is a vital partner, and significant opportunities exist to better coordinate efforts to achieve enhanced outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses and communities.

A key whole-of-government action under Moving Ahead, the Queensland Indigenous (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Procurement Policy (QIPP) sets a target of three per cent of the Queensland Government’s addressable procurement spend with Indigenous owned businesses by 2022.

Since the commencement of the QIPP in 2017, there has been a marked improvement and upward trend in engagement by government agencies with Indigenous businesses. In 2019–20, 475 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander businesses secured $362.7 million in Queensland Government procurement spend.

Actions

Continue to implement the whole-of-government Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander procurement policy with a set target to increase procurement with Indigenous businesses to three per cent of the value of government procurement contracts by 2022 (all departments).

Continue to implement the Queensland Government’s Building and Construction Training Policy to ensure eligible Indigenous projects commit to supporting employment opportunities and skill development (Department of Employment, Small Business and Training).

Continue to implement the Land and Sea Rangers Program providing employment through host organisations for Traditional Owners and other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in land and sea management, and increase access to Country (Department of Environment and Science).

Deliver quality artistic outcomes and opportunities for artists and art workers through the Capacity Building Strategy as part of the ongoing Backing Indigenous Artists initiative (Arts Queensland).

Realise opportunities from the Queen’s Wharf Brisbane Development project to maximise the outcomes, jobs and opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders and Indigenous businesses (Department of Tourism, Innovation and Sport).

Case study: Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers Program

The Queensland Government, through the delivery of the Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers Program, partners with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to care for land and sea country, provide jobs and training, and engage future generations in conservation activities.

Indigenous Land and Sea Ranger groups work to conserve Queensland’s important ecosystems and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural heritage in locations stretching from Cape York to the Bunya Mountains.

The program assists Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations with grants to employ Indigenous Land and Sea ranger teams. The program delivers training, networking and partnership support to ranger groups. Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers deliver negotiated work plans that reflect Traditional Owner, local community and Queensland Government priorities. Their activities include a wide range of environmental and cultural heritage conservation and community engagement activities. Indigenous Land and Sea Rangers are skilled in conservation work and draw upon their experience in managing Country, inter-generational knowledge sharing, and formal conservation and land management or related qualifications in managing Country.

In 2017, the Queensland Government boosted funding to the Indigenous Land and Sea Ranger Program, increasing the current number of ranger positions to over 100 across 23 regional and remote communities.

The Queensland Indigenous Women’s Rangers Network (QIWRN) was established in 2018 as a partnership between the Indigenous Land and Sea Ranger Program, World Wildlife Fund and Yuku Baja Muliku Aboriginal Corporation, located at Archer Point, south of Cooktown.

The QIWRN seeks to encourage young women to consider a career as a ranger, and to develop a network to support skills-exchange and advocacy efforts amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander female rangers in this field. The project has employed a part-time coordinator to mentor female rangers.

This case study was provided by the Department of Environment and Science.